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When the stems and paper have become a smooth pulp, pour the mix out evenly onto a deckle. To make a deckle, stretch out some tights over a mesh screen that is raised above the ground. Let your paper drain and dry out on the deckle for at least a day before hanging it up to dry fully.

The content on Zambeza.com is only suitable for adults and is reserved for those of legal age. By clicking ENTER, you confirm you are 18 years or older. There are multiple reports online of people trying cannabis for the first time, only to get “stuck in a loop” where an altered mind-state persists for days, weeks, or even months. Curious about why this happens or how often it happens? Some users report that the subjectively positive effects of cannabis stay with them long after they would be expected to wear off. However, it is more common for individuals who experience a negative first-time cannabis experience to report persistent, unsettling, and negative after-effects. How often do first-time cannabis users have negative, long lasting effects? First off, it’s important to state that it appears to be only a small minority of first-time users that experience this effect.

Exactly how many is not clear, as official figures do not yet exist on many cannabis-related matters. In the future, as legal cannabis becomes more widespread, a clearer picture should emerge. Is it normal to still feel high the day after first using cannabis? It seems to be fairly common for new users to use a lot of cannabis during a session then go to sleep at night, only to wake up the next day still feeling high. The typical duration of a cannabis high is almost invariably stated to be 2-4 hours. One would expect that a good night’s sleep would be more than enough time for the body to process the THC and for normal consciousness to resume. It is important here to note the difference between people who experience a cannabis “hangover” the day after a session and those who state that they still feel subjectively high. The former usually report feeling “groggy”, “burnt out” and “half-asleep”. This may well be something to do with the fact that cannabis use reduces time spent in REM sleep (an important stage of sleep in which we dream, and thereby refresh and repair various mental processes). This appears to be a different phenomenon from those who claim to still feel “high” or “stoned”. In contrast, the people who genuinely seem to experience an extended high use descriptors like “in a daydream”, “blazed”, “afterglow”, and “delightful”—generally positive and enjoyable. Most of these reports are of feeling high the next morning, but there are also reports of people who continue to feel high for several days. One individual reports feeling “blazed” for up to six days after using cannabis. Another talks about his “delightful” experience the day after his “very psychedelic” first use of cannabis. It is not clear what causes some new users to feel subjectively high for days after using cannabis. It is possible that for some, the breakdown of THC into its metabolites in the liver (which are then secreted in the urine) occurs at a slower rate than in others. This would allow the THC to circulate in the bloodstream for longer, giving it an extended chance to reach the brain, encounter CB₁-receptors, and cause psychoactive effects. Another possibility is the route of administration. Eating cannabis edibles often leads to a delayed peak concentration of THC in the blood, as the cannabinoids are usually dissolved in the fat used to make the edibles. Fat releases the cannabinoids slowly into the bloodstream via the gastrointestinal tract, compared with the rapid administration achieved with smoking, vaping and sublingual sprays, which deliver cannabinoids directly to the bloodstream via the mucous membranes of the mouth. Also, since THC builds up in the adipose (fat) tissues, those with more body fat may experience a slow release effect of THC. By far the most common negative effects reported by first-time cannabis users are anxiety, paranoia, panic, confusion, disorientation and depersonalization.

Again, most of those who experience these negative effects do so in the days or weeks immediately following use of cannabis, and then find that normality quickly returns. However, a small percentage of people state that their intense negative feelings persisted for weeks or even months. In some cases it caused such an unprecedented disturbance to normal life that psychiatric treatment was sought. Anecdotal reports of these persistent negative effects sometimes include the experience of suicidal thoughts and a desire to self-harm. However, it is problematic to assume a causal link between cannabis use and suicide. Those who report such feelings may simply be suffering from or at risk of a separate mental illness.

Some studies have associated cannabis use with an increased risk of suicide, but others have noted that in several U.S. states, suicide rates have dropped since medicinal cannabis programs were implemented. Cannabis use may increase suicidal thinking in certain susceptible individuals. On the other hand, there are those who suffer from chronic pain or intractable illnesses, which is thought to be a risk factor for suicide.

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