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Break down some regional pot prices by size so you can make sure you’re not getting ripped off by your reefer retailer. Establish some cannabis concentrate conversions so you know roughly how much marijuana it takes to make butter for concentrates, edibles , oil , and tinctures . If you want to become an expert in marijuana measurement, read this guide from start to finish. If you’ve come here looking for something specific, we’ll help you find it.

Follow these links to each section of the article: And don’t feel bad if you don’t get it all down on the first try. It may take a while to understand all the conversions and jargon. But with a little practice, you’ll be talking like a long-time stoner in no time. Most Americans are used to measuring things with the United States’ Customary Units as opposed to the International System of Units , better known as the Metric System. Indeed, one of the most confusing things about purchasing and consuming cannabis in the United States is that we use a combination of international metrics and US units to describe the quantities of cannabis we use in our everyday lives. Ounces and pounds are examples of US Customary Units that we borrowed from the British before General Washington’s hemp-clad continental army won our nation’s independence. The gram , a measurement of mass from the International System of Units, originally referred to the weight of a cubic centimeter of water. A gram is now more simply defined as one one-thousandth of a kilogram , which is the current base unit of the international metric system.

The general confusion and vague jargon that every single cannabis consumer has to comprehend in order to keep track of how much medicine they buy and use is the result of the discrepancies between international and U.S. That’s why weed measurements are so confusing: they are a mix of two different measurement systems. It’s like watching a movie that starts off as a rom-com and then suddenly changes to a horror movie about twenty minutes in. At the end, you’re left scratching your head and wondering what the hell just happened. Even if you understand the whole grams-ounces-pound thing, you still have to contend with the long list of slang terms that have come and gone over the years. In the next section, we’ll clarify the conversion between grams and ounces and introduce you to the corresponding ganja jargon. There’s a lot of marijuana slang floating around out there. For the most part, though, it all revolves around a few choice terms. Your budtender will typically refer to their Mary Jane by the following names: Dime Dub Eighth Quarter Half Ounce Full O (or just O) Z (yes, just the letter Z) Here’s the definition of each. A dime bag or a dub sack of weed is stoner slang for $10- or $20-worth of weed respectively. The amount of weed you’ll actually get in exchange for $10-$20 varies wildly depending upon where in the country (or the world) you’re buying your pot. The terms Eighth, Quarter, and Half are slang for portions of an ounce of pot. Here are the gram-to-ounce equivalents: An Eighth = 3.5 grams A Quarter = 7 grams A Half = 14 grams. “Ounce” isn’t a slang term, but “Full O” and “Z” certainly are! A Full O (or just O) and a Z refer to a full ounce (or 28 grams) of marijuana. An ounce is also the most marijuana that a resident of Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington can legally possess in public. “Full O” is fairly self-explanatory (short for full ounce), but you may be wondering where in the wide weed world the term “Z” came from. As with most cannabis slang , the exact origins of the word are lost in the pot haze of time. Most long-time stoners agree, though, that they — or their canna-forefathers (and foremothers) — used the term as a sort of code so they didn’t have to say ounce directly. Well, remember, not so long ago, weed was lumped together with a host of really nasty drugs like heroin and crack. Most of these were sold in increments that included the ounce. So, if you were overheard asking to buy an ounce, there was a pretty good chance you were looking to score an illegal substance. Hence the need for a code word like “Z.” But why “Z” and not “R” or “J” or something else entirely? Again, we don’t know for sure, but the consensus usually falls into one of two camps, with the second being the most common.

“Z” refers to the final letter in the abbreviation for the word ounce (i.e., oz.).

Back in the day, we didn’t have the cool packaging we have now.

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