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strattera and weed

marijuana + strattera?

mr.man
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mr.man
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mr.man
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AlphaNoN
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While we aren’t doctors, it is a bit awkward, possibly dangerous to actually ask a doc if it’s ok to let your kid smoke pot.. There are no physical interactions between marijuana and other drugs, smoking pot isn’t going to cause seizures, heart attacks, liver damage etc. But it may have some pharmacological impact (ie. making the stattera less effective.)

If you want an opinion from someone who’s been on ADHD drugs; do your kid a favor and throw that shit away, the ADD epidemic is motivated by a combination of drug company profit margins, the educational system’s inability to cope with children that don’t fit “the mold”, and plain lazy parenting. Whatever the reasons may be, thousands of generations of children grew up without the need for mood altering drugs before the inception of ADHD, we’ve let a handful of people dictate what a normal child is to the entire world.

bleezyg420
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While we aren’t doctors, it is a bit awkward, possibly dangerous to actually ask a doc if it’s ok to let your kid smoke pot.. There are no physical interactions between marijuana and other drugs, smoking pot isn’t going to cause seizures, hear attacks, liver damage etc. But it may have some pharmacological impact (ie. making the stattera less effective.)

If you want an opinion from someone who’s been on ADHD drugs; do your kid a favor and throw that shit away, the ADD epidemic is motivated by a combination of drug company profit margins, the educational system’s inability to cope with children that don’t fit “the mold”, and plain lazy parenting. Whatever the reasons may be, thousands of generations of children grew up without the need for mood altering drugs before the inception of ADHD, we’ve let a handful of people dictate what a normal child is to the entire world.

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Letting your kid smoke weed as an alternative to medicine is looked down upon by many. Although it might be more effective with less side effects it’s still looked down upon.

leafysmell
Active Member
sir smokesalot
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My wife takes adderall which is different chemically, but smoking helps cut down on the moodiness, the shakes from it bieng a stimulant and helps increase her appetite. it is definitely good to help balance out the side effects of the medication.

if your trying to counteract some of the bad side effects of the meds than it is a good way to go just in my opinion, but you should look into cannabis foods not smoke.

if he wants to just get high tell to go grow his own

makinthemagic
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bleezyg420
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SocataSmoker
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This drug is not like other ADHD medications.
This drug was marketed toward depression and anxiety and it alters the basic chemical responses within the brain.

This doesn’t make my opinion any more different alphanon’s. That stuff will seriously muck up someone’s emotional responses and there is absolutely no way it was adequately tested (think zoloft).

Marijuana might intensify the drowsiness, but that is nothing to be worried about because these two drugs alter the brain in two fundamentally different ways. If anything, your child would feel the effects of MJ more closely than someone not taking jetfuel for neuroreceptors.

wackymack
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fishsnacks
Member

Strattera (atomoxetine) is a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant medication used in the treatment of ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyper Activity) in children, teens, young adults and adults.

Unlike Ritalin, it is not a stimulant, working instead on a series of neuro transmitters in the brain — the neuro-epinephrine system, your body’s own stimulants.

And there is the problem for you right now — marijuana also works on certain neuro transmiters in the brain. including it is believed the neuro epinephrine system as well as (it is known) the serotonin system.

We know these drugs like Strattera and the medications for aantidepression like paxil and Prozac (Serotonin reuptake inhibitors) work, but we have very little idea how.

Any discussion of the mechanics of action of psychotropic medication — which would includeee Strattera and marijuana in this context — needs to maintain a healthy respect for our ignorance.

So should you toke up? Not a good idea until you have been stabilized on your medication, which can take a few weeks.

Sorry for the downer my friend but give the new medication a chance to reach it’s “normal” level before you start smoking again.

hi, my son is 16 and hes been takeing straterra since he was 15 ok, he knows im growing and wants to smoke some of my weed but before i let him (iv looked…

Are there any potentially dangerous pharmacological effects of combining ADHD medication with alcohol and drugs of abuse? A systematic review of the literature

Abstract

Background

Among young people up to 18 years of age, approximately 5 % have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), many of whom have symptoms persisting into adulthood. ADHD is associated with increased risk of co-morbid psychiatric disorders, including substance misuse. Many will be prescribed medication, namely methylphenidate, atomoxetine, dexamphetamine and lisdexamfetamine. If so, it is important to know if interactions exist and if they are potentially toxic.

Methods

Three databases (Medline, EMBASE and PsychINFO) from a 22 year period (1992 – June 2014) were searched systematically. Key search terms included alcohol, substance related disorders, methylphenidate, atomoxetine, dexamphetamine, lisdexamfetamine, and death, which identified 493 citations (344 after removal of duplicates). The eligibility of each study was assessed jointly by two investigators, leaving 20 relevant articles.

Results

We identified only a minimal increase in side-effects when ADHD medication (therapeutic doses) was taken with alcohol. None of the reviewed studies showed severe sequelae among those who had overdosed on ADHD medication and other coingestants, including alcohol.

Conclusions

The numbers across all the papers studied remain too low to exclude uncommon effects. Also, studies of combined effects with novel psychoactive substances have not yet appeared in the literature. Nevertheless, no serious sequelae were identified from combining ADHD medication with alcohol/illicit substances from the pre-novel psychoactive substance era.

Background

Among young people up to 18 years of age, approximately 5 % world-wide are said to have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a neurodevelopmental syndrome of impulsiveness, inattention, and overactivity that can result in long-term educational and social disadvantage [1, 2]. Symptoms persist into adulthood for a significant minority [3]. Co-morbid substance use disorders (SUD) involving alcohol and cannabis misuse but also stimulants, depressants, hallucinogens and now novel psychoactive substances (NPS) or ‘legal highs’ emerge in adolescence [4]. Young people with ADHD are significantly more likely to develop SUDs than those without ADHD [5].

Many people with ADHD are prescribed medication for their symptoms, particularly stimulants, (often methylphenidate and dexamphetamine) and atomoxetine (NICE 2006). If an individual is suspected of misusing substances, it is crucial to understand if it safe also to prescribe medication. We contacted the manufacturers who recommended that stimulants and atomoxetine not be coingested with alcohol or illicit substances. They had no specific information on potential interactions.

There is limited empirical evidence to guide whether it is advised to treat ADHD before, simultaneously, or only after remission of SUDs [6, 7]. Current guidelines suggest that cannabis use may not be a contraindication to pharmacological treatment but due to shared neurochemical mechanisms, and while not explicitly mentioned, certain novel psychoactive substances (NPAs), ‘cocaine is likely to be a real hazard’ [8]. In the absence of such information, faced with adolescents misusing substances the tendency is for clinicians to avoid prescribing. As adolescents with untreated compared to treated ADHD may have poorer long-term outcomes, this may leave the most vulnerable without adequate intervention [9].

Methylphenidate and dexamphetamine are sympathomimetic agents thought to act both in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripherally by enhancing dopaminergic and noradrenergic transmission through blockade of relevant transporters [10]. There is theoretical potential and some animal evidence for additive effects between prescribed and non-prescribed sympathomimetic agents [11, 12] potentially resulting in a toxic sympathomimetic syndrome with prominent cardiac and neurological effects [10, 12]. Such a syndrome may underly so-called ‘excited delirium’; agitation, paranoia, hyperthermia and muscle breakdown, symptoms similar to neuroleptic malignant syndrome [13]. However, there is also evidence that different stimulants may compete for receptor binding sites limiting the potential for additive effects [14].

Atomoxetine is a selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor metabolised by the hepatic oxidase system [15]. It has a chemical structure that resembles the SSRI fluoxetine, that has been implicated in the emergence of mania or the serotonin syndrome, comprised of mental, autonomic and neurological effects [16]. This suggests that toxic or tolerability effects could arise in alcohol misusing individuals [17], through additive effects with stimulants or with NPS that impact serotonin receptors.

Methods

We systematically searched three databases (Medline, EMBASE and PsychINFO) from the past 22-years (1992 – June 2014) using PRISMA guidelines [18]. Only those articles that had abstracts available in the English language were included. We used the key search terms alcohol, substance related disorders, death, and combined these with methylphenidate, atomoxetine, dexamphetamine and lisdexamfetamine in turn.

Titles and abstracts of all articles found were screened by XB and PM. Full text articles were screened by XB and PM. The references of all full text articles included were also hand searched to identify any other potentially relevant articles. Study quality was assessed using the relevant tools from Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP) or the STROBE document as appropriate to the study type [19].

We included articles which mentioned the coingestion of ADHD medication (methylphenidate, dexamphetamine, lisdexamfetamine and atomoxetine) with another substance including alcohol, publications relating to animal models, and, due to the paucity of data regarding adolescents, all age groups. Also, to clarify mechanisms that might underlie toxicity, we included certain articles covering the physiological effects of ADHD medication alone. We excluded articles relating to the abuse of ADHD medication alone, case reports, articles relating to exposure of illicit drugs or alcohol in utero, foetal alcohol syndrome, and to cigarette smokers only.

Our main outcome was to identify any potential effects (whether positive or negative) on an individual should they combine their ADHD medication with alcohol or an illicit substance. We acknowledge the dangers of diversion of stimulant medication in the substance misuse population; however our study did not focus on this element.

Results

The search strategy identified 493 citations (344 after removal of duplicates), of which 59 were potentially relevant. We also obtained 6 other articles from hand searching the references, providing 65 articles (Fig. 1). Twenty articles met inclusion criteria. In relation to bias, six of the included studies were found to have a low risk of bias [20–25], four a high risk [26–29] and 10 an unsure risk of bias [17, 30–38].

Among young people up to 18 years of age, approximately 5 % have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), many of whom have symptoms persisting into adulthood. ADHD is associated with increased risk of co-morbid psychiatric disorders, including substance misuse. Many will be prescribed medication, namely methylphenidate, atomoxetine, dexamphetamine and lisdexamfetamine. If so, it is important to know if interactions exist and if they are potentially toxic. Three databases (Medline, EMBASE and PsychINFO) from a 22 year period (1992 – June 2014) were searched systematically. Key search terms included alcohol, substance related disorders, methylphenidate, atomoxetine, dexamphetamine, lisdexamfetamine, and death, which identified 493 citations (344 after removal of duplicates). The eligibility of each study was assessed jointly by two investigators, leaving 20 relevant articles. We identified only a minimal increase in side-effects when ADHD medication (therapeutic doses) was taken with alcohol. None of the reviewed studies showed severe sequelae among those who had overdosed on ADHD medication and other coingestants, including alcohol. The numbers across all the papers studied remain too low to exclude uncommon effects. Also, studies of combined effects with novel psychoactive substances have not yet appeared in the literature. Nevertheless, no serious sequelae were identified from combining ADHD medication with alcohol/illicit substances from the pre-novel psychoactive substance era.