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That’s 3.5 — so there are 3.5 grams of weed in an eighth. Here’s the breakdown for how many grams are in the different quantities of weed: 1 eighth = ⅛-ounce = 3.5 grams 1 quarter = ¼-ounce = 7 grams 1 half = ½-ounce = 14 grams 1 ounce = 28 grams 1 pound = 16 ounces = 448 grams. How to Determine if there are 28 Grams in an Ounce of Weed. Now that we’ve covered how many grams are in an ounce of weed, let’s talk about how to determine if the ounce you’re dealing with weighs the full 28 grams. Actually, let’s first talk about how not to determine if there is 28 grams in an ounce of weed and that’s by eyeballing it.

There is far too wide a variety in flower shape, size, and density to be able to accurately determine a gram of cannabis — and when you multiply those variables times 28, it becomes even more impossible to determine the weight of an ounce by sight. If you want to accurately measure how many grams are in an ounce, there’s only one way to do it — and that’s with a scale. When you buy weed at a dispensary, your budtender should weigh out the flower in front of you; that way, you can see the number on the scale for yourself — and you can know exactly how many grams are in that ounce before you get your weed packaged up and walk out the door. If you want to measure for yourself, you can also invest in a personal scale to keep at home; just make sure the scale is designed to weigh small amounts. Another option is to download a scale app on your smartphone. Just be aware they’re not as accurate as a physical scale, so if you’re concerned with knowing exactly how many grams are in your ounce of weed, this isn’t going to be your best bet. The information contained in this site is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical or legal advice. Do you tell your budtender just to give you $20, $50, or $100 worth of weed without knowing how much actual medicine you’re getting for your money?

Have you ever felt embarrassed when your budtender asks if you want a dub or an eighth because you have no @#!$ing idea what they are talking about? Does the world stop making sense when your budtender tells you how much an ounce of your favorite strain costs? Many people who are green to buying grass have felt this way at one point or another. Seems like someone should reform this particular speed bump in canna-culture. But, honestly, the marijuana metric system has been around for so long that it’s going to be nearly impossible to change. That’s why the experts at Honest Marijuana have produced this instructional article—to help you make sense of the various standard amounts that you’ll find in your local dispensary. That way, you don’t have to look like a total newb when you make your first buy. Along the way, we’ll also: Explain all the ganja jargon commonly used among cannabis users in the United States. Break down some regional pot prices by size so you can make sure you’re not getting ripped off by your reefer retailer. Establish some cannabis concentrate conversions so you know roughly how much marijuana it takes to make butter for concentrates, edibles , oil , and tinctures . If you want to become an expert in marijuana measurement, read this guide from start to finish. If you’ve come here looking for something specific, we’ll help you find it. Follow these links to each section of the article: And don’t feel bad if you don’t get it all down on the first try. It may take a while to understand all the conversions and jargon. But with a little practice, you’ll be talking like a long-time stoner in no time. Most Americans are used to measuring things with the United States’ Customary Units as opposed to the International System of Units , better known as the Metric System. Indeed, one of the most confusing things about purchasing and consuming cannabis in the United States is that we use a combination of international metrics and US units to describe the quantities of cannabis we use in our everyday lives. Ounces and pounds are examples of US Customary Units that we borrowed from the British before General Washington’s hemp-clad continental army won our nation’s independence. The gram , a measurement of mass from the International System of Units, originally referred to the weight of a cubic centimeter of water. A gram is now more simply defined as one one-thousandth of a kilogram , which is the current base unit of the international metric system. The general confusion and vague jargon that every single cannabis consumer has to comprehend in order to keep track of how much medicine they buy and use is the result of the discrepancies between international and U.S.

That’s why weed measurements are so confusing: they are a mix of two different measurement systems. It’s like watching a movie that starts off as a rom-com and then suddenly changes to a horror movie about twenty minutes in. At the end, you’re left scratching your head and wondering what the hell just happened. Even if you understand the whole grams-ounces-pound thing, you still have to contend with the long list of slang terms that have come and gone over the years. In the next section, we’ll clarify the conversion between grams and ounces and introduce you to the corresponding ganja jargon. There’s a lot of marijuana slang floating around out there. For the most part, though, it all revolves around a few choice terms. Your budtender will typically refer to their Mary Jane by the following names: Dime Dub Eighth Quarter Half Ounce Full O (or just O) Z (yes, just the letter Z) Here’s the definition of each. A dime bag or a dub sack of weed is stoner slang for $10- or $20-worth of weed respectively. The amount of weed you’ll actually get in exchange for $10-$20 varies wildly depending upon where in the country (or the world) you’re buying your pot.

The terms Eighth, Quarter, and Half are slang for portions of an ounce of pot. Here are the gram-to-ounce equivalents: An Eighth = 3.5 grams A Quarter = 7 grams A Half = 14 grams. “Ounce” isn’t a slang term, but “Full O” and “Z” certainly are!

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