portable spoon

We know that might be intolerable or even impossible. There are many reasons why people choose to use cannabis, and we don't judge; we just puff, puff, pass. So, you make your best choice and continue to partake.

But, you suddenly find yourself facing a drug test. Read on to find out how to get THC out of your system. The length of time cannabis stays in your system is affected by your unique biology and habits. While everyone is different, cannabis is usually detectable in fluids like urine and saliva from 1–30 days after last use. THC is metabolised in the liver, where it gets broken down into over 80 metabolites. Eventually, THC and its metabolites are excreted, leaving your system. However, many of these compounds linger in your system longer than THC itself.

Most drug tests are designed to detect certain metabolites, like tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH). FACTORS THAT AFFECT HOW QUICKLY YOU METABOLISE THC. So, how long does it take for any trace of weed to leave your system? Your own THC timeline relies on numerous factors, including: • How much/how frequently you consume cannabis • How much body fat you have/metabolic rate • How sensitive the drug test is/type of drug test. The amount (and frequency) of cannabis you regularly consume is perhaps the biggest factor. This one really is a no-brainer: The more cannabis you consume, the more metabolites there are knocking around in your body. Cannabis taken orally, like edibles, may also linger in your system longer than smoking. Consumption rules apply to both individual doses and long-term habits. Two grams of weed will take longer to leave your system than one. Weed that's more potent will take more time to clear out too. If you're an occasional user, your system will eliminate THC faster. If you're a chronic user of cannabis, you may need extra time to abstain before you can pass a drug test. THC is detectable for longer in chronic users because THC metabolites get stored in fat cells (they are lipid soluble). A person with less body fat will store fewer of these molecules, and a person with more body fat will store more. Females tend to have more body fat than males, so women may metabolise cannabinoids more slowly. A person's overall metabolic rate also plays a large role. Some people can burn calories just by sitting around, while others struggle to lose weight even with an active lifestyle. Those with a faster metabolism will process and eliminate cannabinoid metabolites more quickly. Just be aware, if you exercise heavily before a drug test, the fat you burn could release more THC metabolites into your system, causing a temporary spike. Different drug tests—urine, hair, saliva, blood—have different detection windows. Many, like hair and urine screenings, measure the THC metabolite THC-COOH, while blood tests measure levels of THC itself. Of all the standard testing methods, urine testing is by far the most common [1] . If you're being drug tested at work, it's almost always going to be a urine test. Test sensitivity refers to the cutoff concentration of THC or its metabolites, above which a test is considered positive. The cutoff for most cannabis urine tests is 50ng/ml of THC-COOH.

However, it is possible for the cutoff to be set as low as 15ng/ml.

The more sensitive the test, the longer the detection window is. According to available research, these are the most common detection windows for different drug tests. Keep in mind, the timeline varies according to your unique physiology and personal habits. Cannabis and its metabolites are detectable in urine [2] for varying amounts of time after last use, depending on how frequent of a user you are: • Occasional user (one to three times per week): 3 days • Moderate user (four times per week): 5–7 days • Chronic user (daily): 10–15 days • Heavy chronic user (multiple times per day): 30+ days. This is, of course, assuming the test sensitivity cutoff is a standard 50ng/ml.

Menu

Get in touch