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pax 2 box

PAX 2 Vaporizer

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Features

  • Dry Herb Only
  • 4 Temperature Settings
  • 45 Second Heat Up
  • 90 Minute Battery Life

Who’s the PAX 2 for?

The PAX 2 vaporizer is a perfect everyday-carry vape with nice even vaporization, solid battery life, an incredibly discreet look and with its smart heating very efficient with your herbs. Smaller, more powerful and yet still more efficient than the original PAX 1, the PAX 2 is a seriously streamlined portable vaporizer.

Small

Weighing 10% lighter than the original PAX 1, the PAX 2 is 25% smaller in size, making it a perfect everyday carry.

Smart

The PAX 2 is outfitted with lip and motion sensors optimizing power use and temperature. The glowing ‘X’ (PAX-logo) LED tells you everything you need to know about your PAX 2. Whether it’s heating up, ready to vape or the battery level, the LED tells it all.

Powerful

The PAX 2 Vaporizer has a higher capacity battery than the original PAX 1, giving you about 30% more vaping time.

Check out the PAX 3 here

Easy to use

Remove the magnetic lid, load your aromatic blend, turn the unit on and the PAX 2 is ready to use in under a minute. It’s that simple.

Even vaporization

The PAX 2 utilizes conduction heating and features 4 temperature settings between 360°F (182°C) and 420°F (216°C). The chamber is larger than the original PAX 1, and offers more consistent, even heating of your blend with a sizable capacity giving you an impressive 10-15 draws out of a fresh fill.

You’re covered

The PAX 2 comes with a 2 year warranty and, like everything we sell, our 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.

…there’s more

Not only is the PAX 2 a sleek and intuitive vaporizer, it is interactive. The PAX 2 comes with “party mode” to enjoy with your friends as well as hidden features and games like Simon.

The PAX 2 Vaporizer is a great ultra-portable vaporizer ✅. Buy now to get FREE gifts and shipping and a 100% satisfaction guarantee with easy returns. ✅

Paired box protein Pax-2-A

pax2-a

Annotation score:3 out of 5

The annotation score provides a heuristic measure of the annotation content of a UniProtKB entry or proteome. This score cannot be used as a measure of the accuracy of the annotation as we cannot define the ‘correct annotation’ for any given protein.

– Experimental evidence at transcript level i

This indicates the type of evidence that supports the existence of the protein. Note that the ‘protein existence’ evidence does not give information on the accuracy or correctness of the sequence(s) displayed.

Select a section on the left to see content.

This section provides any useful information about the protein, mostly biological knowledge.

Manually curated information which has been propagated from a related experimentally characterized protein.

Manual assertion inferred from sequence similarity to i

Regions

This subsection of the Function section specifies the position and type of each DNA-binding domain present within the protein.

Manual validated information which has been generated by the UniProtKB automatic annotation system.

Manual assertion according to rules i

The Gene Ontology (GO) project provides a set of hierarchical controlled vocabulary split into 3 categories:

GO – Molecular function i

  • DNA binding Source: UniProtKB
GO – Biological process i
  • negative regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase II Source: UniProtKB
  • positive regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase II Source: UniProtKB
  • segment polarity determination Source: UniProtKB-KW

UniProtKB Keywords constitute a controlled vocabulary with a hierarchical structure. Keywords summarise the content of a UniProtKB entry and facilitate the search for proteins of interest.

Molecular function Developmental protein, DNA-binding, Segmentation polarity protein
Biological process Transcription, Transcription regulation

This section provides information about the protein and gene name(s) and synonym(s) and about the organism that is the source of the protein sequence.

Names & Taxonomy i

This subsection of the Names and taxonomy section provides an exhaustive list of all names of the protein, from commonly used to obsolete, to allow unambiguous identification of a protein.

This subsection of the Names and taxonomy section indicates the name(s) of the gene(s) that code for the protein sequence(s) described in the entry. Four distinct tokens exist: ‘Name’, ‘Synonyms’, ‘Ordered locus names’ and ‘ORF names’.

Manually validated information which has been imported from another database.

Manual assertion inferred from database entries i

This subsection of the Names and taxonomy section provides information on the name(s) of the organism that is the source of the protein sequence.

This subsection of the Names and taxonomy section shows the unique identifier assigned by the NCBI to the source organism of the protein. This is known as the ‘taxonomic identifier’ or ‘taxid’.

This subsection of the Names and taxonomy section contains the taxonomic hierarchical classification lineage of the source organism. It lists the nodes as they appear top-down in the taxonomic tree, with the more general grouping listed first.

Organism-specific databases

Xenopus laevis and tropicalis biology and genomics resource

This section provides information on the location and the topology of the mature protein in the cell.

Subcellular location i

Extracellular region or secreted

Automatic computational assertion

Graphics by Christian Stolte & Seán O’Donoghue; Source:

  • UniProt annotation
  • GO – Cellular component
Nucleus
  • Nucleus PROSITE-ProRule annotation

Manual assertion according to rules i

Manual assertion inferred from sequence similarity to i

Nucleus
  • nucleus Source: UniProtKB
Keywords – Cellular component i

This section describes post-translational modifications (PTMs) and/or processing events.

PTM / Processing i

Molecule processing

This subsection of the ‘PTM / Processing’ section describes the extent of a polypeptide chain in the mature protein following processing or proteolytic cleavage.

This section provides information on the expression of a gene at the mRNA or protein level in cells or in tissues of multicellular organisms.

This subsection of the ‘Expression’ section provides information on the expression of a gene at the mRNA or protein level in cells or in tissues of multicellular organisms. By default, the information is derived from experiments at the mRNA level, unless specified ‘at protein level’.
Examples: P92958, Q8TDN4, O14734

Tissue specificity i

Manually curated information for which there is published experimental evidence.

Manual assertion based on experiment in i

This subsection of the ‘Expression’ section provides information on the expression of the gene product at various stages of a cell, tissue or organism development. By default, the information is derived from experiments at the mRNA level, unless specified ‘at the protein level’.

Developmental stage i

Manual assertion based on experiment in i

This subsection of the ‘Expression’ section reports the experimentally proven effects of inducers and repressors (usually chemical compounds or environmental factors) on the level of protein (or mRNA) expression (up-regulation, down-regulation, constitutive expression).

Manual assertion based on experiment in i

This section provides information on the tertiary and secondary structure of a protein.

3D structure databases

SWISS-MODEL Repository – a database of annotated 3D protein structure models

Database of comparative protein structure models

This section provides information on sequence similarities with other proteins and the domain(s) present in a protein.

Family & Domains i

Region

This subsection of the ‘Family and Domains’ section describes a region of interest that cannot be described in other subsections.

Manual assertion according to rules i

Manual assertion according to rules i

Keywords – Domain i
Phylogenomic databases

KEGG Orthology (KO)

Identification of Orthologs from Complete Genome Data

Database of Orthologous Groups

Family and domain databases

Conserved Domains Database

Gene3D Structural and Functional Annotation of Protein Families

Integrated resource of protein families, domains and functional sites

The PANTHER Classification System

Pfam protein domain database

Protein Motif fingerprint database; a protein domain database

Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool; a protein domain database

Superfamily database of structural and functional annotation

PROSITE; a protein domain and family database

This section displays by default the canonical protein sequence and upon request all isoforms described in the entry. It also includes information pertinent to the sequence(s), including length and molecular weight. The information is filed in different subsections. The current subsections and their content are listed below:

This subsection of the Sequence section indicates if the canonical sequence displayed by default in the entry is complete or not.

Sequence status i : Complete.

This entry describes 6

This subsection of the ‘Sequence’ section lists the alternative protein sequences (isoforms) that can be generated from the same gene by a single or by the combination of up to four biological events (alternative promoter usage, alternative splicing, alternative initiation and ribosomal frameshifting). Additionally, this section gives relevant information on each alternative protein isoform. This section is only present in reviewed entries, i.e. in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot.

isoforms i produced by alternative splicing . AlignAdd to basketAdded to basket

Manual assertion based on experiment in i

This isoform has been chosen as the

What is the canonical sequence?

canonical i sequence. All positional information in this entry refers to it. This is also the sequence that appears in the downloadable versions of the entry.

The checksum is a form of redundancy check that is calculated from the sequence. It is useful for tracking sequence updates.

It should be noted that while, in theory, two different sequences could have the same checksum value, the likelihood that this would happen is extremely low.

However UniProtKB may contain entries with identical sequences in case of multiple genes (paralogs).

The checksum is computed as the sequence 64-bit Cyclic Redundancy Check value (CRC64) using the generator polynomial: x 64 + x 4 + x 3 + x + 1. The algorithm is described in the ISO 3309 standard.

Press W.H., Flannery B.P., Teukolsky S.A. and Vetterling W.T.
Cyclic redundancy and other checksums
Numerical recipes in C 2nd ed., pp896-902, Cambridge University Press (1993))

Checksum: i 2815A8C329878237

Manual assertion based on experiment in i

The sequence of this isoform differs from the canonical sequence as follows:
307-376: Missing.
412-444: Missing.

Manual assertion based on experiment in i

The sequence of this isoform differs from the canonical sequence as follows:
307-376: Missing.

Manual assertion based on experiment in i

The sequence of this isoform differs from the canonical sequence as follows:
166-205: Missing.
307-376: Missing.
412-444: Missing.

Manual assertion based on experiment in i

The sequence of this isoform differs from the canonical sequence as follows:
206-376: Missing.
445-445: S → FLGS

The sequence of this isoform differs from the canonical sequence as follows:
166-376: Missing.
412-444: Missing.
445-445: S → FLGS

Experimental Info

This subsection of the ‘Sequence’ section reports difference(s) between the canonical sequence (displayed by default in the entry) and the different sequence submissions merged in the entry. These various submissions may originate from different sequencing projects, different types of experiments, or different biological samples. Sequence conflicts are usually of unknown origin.

Alternative sequence

This subsection of the ‘Sequence’ section describes the sequence of naturally occurring alternative protein isoform(s). The changes in the amino acid sequence may be due to alternative splicing, alternative promoter usage, alternative initiation, or ribosomal frameshifting.

Manually curated information that is based on statements in scientific articles for which there is no experimental support.

Manual assertion based on opinion in i

Manual assertion based on opinion in i

Manual assertion based on opinion in i

Manual assertion based on opinion in i

Manual assertion based on opinion in i

Manual assertion based on opinion in i

Sequence databases

EMBL nucleotide sequence database

GenBank nucleotide sequence database

DNA Data Bank of Japan; a nucleotide sequence database

NCBI Reference Sequences

Genome annotation databases

Database of genes from NCBI RefSeq genomes

KEGG: Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes

Keywords – Coding sequence diversity i

This section provides links to proteins that are similar to the protein sequence(s) described in this entry at different levels of sequence identity thresholds (100%, 90% and 50%) based on their membership in UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef).

Similar proteins i

  • 100% Identity
  • 90% Identity
  • 50% Identity

This section is used to point to information related to entries and found in data collections other than UniProtKB.

Sequence databases
3D structure databases
SMR i O57685
ModBase i Search.
Genome annotation databases
GeneID i 379520
KEGG i xla:379520
Organism-specific databases

Comparative Toxicogenomics Database

Phylogenomic databases
KO i K15608
OMA i DPVHIRG
OrthoDB i 592933at2759
Family and domain databases

ProtoNet; Automatic hierarchical classification of proteins

MobiDB: a database of protein disorder and mobility annotations

This section provides general information on the entry.

Entry information i

This subsection of the ‘Entry information’ section provides a mnemonic identifier for a UniProtKB entry, but it is not a stable identifier. Each reviewed entry is assigned a unique entry name upon integration into UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot.

This subsection of the ‘Entry information’ section provides one or more accession number(s). These are stable identifiers and should be used to cite UniProtKB entries. Upon integration into UniProtKB, each entry is assigned a unique accession number, which is called ‘Primary (citable) accession number’.

This subsection of the ‘Entry information’ section shows the date of integration of the entry into UniProtKB, the date of the last sequence update and the date of the last annotation modification (‘Last modified’). The version number for both the entry and the canonical sequence are also displayed.

This subsection of the ‘Entry information’ section indicates whether the entry has been manually annotated and reviewed by UniProtKB curators or not, in other words, if the entry belongs to the Swiss-Prot section of UniProtKB (reviewed) or to the computer-annotated TrEMBL section (unreviewed).

Probable transcription factor. Involved in kidney development, acting synergistically with lhx1/lim-1 in pronephric morphogenesis during the tailbud stages (By similarity).