how to use a weed grinder properly

The excavation of a kurgan (burial mound) in Russia in 2013 uncovered hundreds of ancient gold bongs when a construction crew was clearing the land to install new power lines. The bongs had been used to smoke cannabis and opium, and were most likely introduced into tribal ceremonies of some kind. Bongs certainly have come a very long way since being used by ancient Scythian tribes. These days the bong industry reaches $1 billion a year.

Whatever kind of bong you need, online head shops are a modern way to meet your needs, and at Toker Supply, we have every conceivable bong under the sun to choose from. In a word, no… but there are benefits to initiating the flowering stage as soon as possible. Giving a 12/12 light schedule from seed is a great way to create tiny “bud stick” plants, which may be perfect for a small stealthy garden. When modified slightly, the same basic technique can create bigger plants and bigger yields while adding little to no extra time before harvest. The “12 /12 from seed” technique aims to initiate the flowering stage immediately after germination. This creates small “bud stick” plants that are typically ready to harvest in 3-4 months. Check out this beautiful example of “12/12 from seed” by Fuel. If you haven’t heard this term before, “12/12 from seed” means giving your cannabis seedling 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark each day from the moment of germination.

Providing a 12/12 light schedule initiates the flowering stage and causes cannabis plants to start making buds. The idea of this technique is to get seedlings to start flowering as quickly as possible to reduce the time to harvest. Once a plant has started flowering, most strains are ready to harvest within 12 weeks. The sooner you get a plant to start flowering, the sooner you get to harvest. There’s just one major problem… 12/12 from seed often causes stunted growth and small yields . This results in yields that are often less than 1 ounce per plant, even under strong grow lights. This seedling took nearly 4 months from seed to harvest under about 150W of fluorescent lights and yielded only 1/2 of an ounce. I think it looks kind of cool, but 1/2 ounces is not a great harvest after waiting so long. I’ve found you can tweak the light schedule to double or triple your total yield per plant without necessarily increasing time-to-harvest or plant height. Something that’s a bit confusing about 12/12 from seed is it seems like seedlings should start flowering immediately. I’ve found that photoperiod seedlings won’t start flowering until they’re 3-4 weeks old no matter the light schedule. That means your harvest won’t come any sooner if you initiate 12/12 before seedlings are 3 weeks old. When you give the plant 3-4 weeks of 18+ hours a day, THEN switch to 12/12, you often get better results because plants are quite bigger when buds start forming, without adding much (if any) time to harvest. Most seedlings won’t make buds until they’re at least 3 weeks old from germination. There’s nothing you could do to get this little seedling to start flowering. You often get better yields by giving plants 18+ hours of light a day for the first 3-4 weeks. These plants got 18/6 until they reached this size. I started the 12/12 light schedule right after the above picture. They ended up yielding a lot more than my plants that were given 12/12 from seed in the same setup. Yet they didn’t get much taller or take longer to harvest. Here are those same plants a month later after they started making buds (plants double or triple in height after the switch to 12/12, especially young plants) A few weeks of extra light, in the beginning, seems to achieve plants with longer and fatter buds (why was this plant defoliated?) Plants reward you for giving them a little more time to grow. For example, a solid 4 weeks of 18/6 before 12/12 creates plants that are ready to harvest around the same time as a plant given 12/12 from seed (3-4 months, depending on the strain), but significantly bigger yields. If you’re worried about plants getting too big, you can gain complete control of plant shape by topping and bending plants to stay flat when they’re young.

This increases the amount of bud produced without raising the overall height.

Many people who give 12/12 from seed have chosen this technique to ensure plants stay as small as possible. That’s why it’s common to see these plants in very small pots (like solo cups). Just like with bonsai trees, restricting root space is an effective way to reduce overall plant size. Plants kept in solo cups rarely get bigger than one long bud stick, especially when given 12/12 from seed.

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