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We also recommend addressing any environmental factors first, then following up by pruning and hosing down your plants. Remember, spider mites like hot and dry conditions. So, before you get started on any kind of countermeasure against a colony, try bringing down the temperature in your grow room (if possible, bring them down past 20ºC or 68ºF but be careful not to damage your plants). Next, create some extra air circulation in your grow area.

Once you’ve addressed any environmental factors in your grow area, it’s time to start pruning. If you’re only dealing with a small infestation, cut down any infected areas well past the mites’ webbing and discard them in the trash. If you’re dealing with larger infections on individual plants, consider destroying them to avoid the mites spreading. Once you’ve pruned your plants, consider hosing them down gently. This will help remove any remaining mites and will also help prevent another infestation. You may want to hose them down periodically if you find you're dealing with mites on a regular basis. Once you’ve done all of that, you may want to use one of the below control methods to minimise the risk of a future infestation. Remember to check up on your plants daily and to repeat treatment at least twice to avoid having the mites coming back. Note: some growers hose down plants with a mix of water and alcohol (9:1 ratio).

This mixture is known to kill mites on contact without damaging plants. Ladybugs, lacewings and predatory mites prey on spider mites and are generally available commercially. For the best results, introduce these insects when mite populations are low. Ladybugs are by far the most common insect used to counter a spider mite infestation. For more detailed tips on how to use ladybugs in your garden, click here. Other insects that prey on spider mites include: Sixspotted thrips Minute pirate bugs Bigeyed bugs Western flower thrips. There are a number of organic insecticides on the market that can help control a spider mite infestation. Here are some popular solutions we recommend trying: Essentria IC3: Containing a mix of horticultural oils, this organic spray can be directly applied to your plants using a mister. However, the spray only remains active for 8-12 hours, so you may need to use it daily or combine it with another product or control method. Spinosad: These products are completely organic and do not damage plants. You can apply any of these products to your plants during an infestation to kill mites on contact or add them to your plants’ water supply for long-term protection against mites and other pests. NukeEm: This is a relatively new insecticide made from food-grade ingredients. It can kill mites the egg, larvae or adult stage, and doesn’t leave any residue on the plant. SM-90: An organic wetting agent with a beautiful aroma. Mix this with water and apply it to your plants with a mister to kill any mites on contact. Insecticidal soaps: Insecticidal soaps are great for spot-treating infested areas of your plants. They leave very little residue on your plants but you should still avoid getting any directly on your buds. Multiple treatments may be necessary as soaps do not stay active for long. There are a variety of essential oils that can help to kill and control spider mites by attacking their central nervous system. Neem oil (extracted from the nuts of the neem tree) is considered a miticide and is the most common type of essential oil used to control mites. However, there are plenty others out there, including: Eucalyptus oil Cinnamon oil Lemon oil Peppermint oil Rosemary oil Eucalyptus oil Cinnamon oil Lemon oil Peppermint oil Rosemary oil Eucalyptus oil Cinnamon oil Lemon oil Peppermint oil Rosemary oil Eucalyptus oil Cinnamon oil Lemon oil Peppermint oil Rosemary oil. These oils can be mixed with water and liberally applied to your plants. However, many of these oils are very aromatic, so you may want to avoid getting them on your buds to avoid changing their taste or smell. Alternatively, you may want to treat your plants periodically with horticultural oils.

We generally recommend using vegetable oils, such as canola, soybean or cottonseed. Spider mites are part of the mite family and are related to spiders, ticks, and other mites. Although they’re a common cannabis pest, they can be very difficult to get rid of. First Sign of Spider Mite Damage – Tiny Specks (Bite Marks) On Leaves. Picture of spider mites on a cannabis leaf – they’re tiny and often found under the leaves. Learn how to get rid of spider mites for good – this pest can be a marijuana grower’s worst nightmare! Spider mites have tiny sharp mouths that pierce individual plant cells and suck out the contents. This is what results in the tiny yellow, orange or white speckles you see on your plant leaves. Spider mites are common cannabis pests, especially when growing in soil. Although less common in hydroponics, spider mites can show up in any setup where cannabis is being cultivated!

Extreme Close-Up of Two-Spotted Spider Mites with Egg.

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