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It’s so easy to use, just cut a hole in the side of the can or bottle towards the bottom, and screw in the presto pipe. When you're done, unscrew the Presto Pipe and recycle the bottle. This smoking accessory is perfect for the hiker, camper, festivalgoer, or outdoorsy type who enjoys smoking on the go. Beloved by many smokers, the gravity water pipe has been saving the party when there were no rolling papers around for decades. All materials needed for this D-I-Y project can be found around your home and are easy to come by.

To get started you will need: 2-liter bottle 1-liter bottle Paperclip Aluminum foil Knife or box cutter Scissors. First, cut off the bottom of the 1-liter bottle, but only about 2 inches using scissors. If you cut off too much, you won’t have enough room to fill the bottle with smoke. Next, cut the top off of the 2-liter bottle and fill it up with water. Using the box cutter or knife, cut a hole in the 1-liter bottle lid, making an “x”. Then, place the aluminum foil over the bottle cap and poke a few holes for ventilation. Push the 1-liter bottle down into the water making sure the cap stays above water. Carefully twist the cap onto the bottle and put the tobacco on top of your makeshift “bowl”.

Light the tobacco and lift the 1-liter bottle as it fills with smoke. Once you’re ready to smoke, remove the tin foil bowl and push down as you inhale the smoke. This classic method is probably the most popular among seasoned smokers who know how to keep the party going. These are all wonderful ways to smoke on the go, but for the best smoking experience, it's better to be prepared. Check out some of Rolling Paper Depot's top selling products, and enjoy a better smoking session. Top 5 hacks for when you run out of smoking papers. Every dedicated cannabis user ought to be carrying around a kit of essential items at all times. Omitting this crucial aspect of the stoner routine is just unprofessional. But even the best of us get caught out at times, and go to roll a joint only to discover there are no smoking papers to be found. You may find yourself asking: what can I use as rolling paper? We all remember schooldays when someone managed to smuggle in an eighth but—surprise surprise!—didn’t manage to steal any smoking papers from out of their big brother’s stash box. And then eventually you all end up huddled behind the sports hall frantically trying to roll joints out of toilet paper, magazine covers and old receipts, and you’ve wasted most of the weed so far trying to do it… So thank heaven that those days are long behind (most of) us, and we now have an array of superior options to go for, in the astoundingly rare event that we plan poorly enough to run out of OCB’s and there’s nary a head shop to be found. If you happen to be artistically-minded, or just the type of person that likes to do brass rubbings when out and about, you may be the kind of person who carries around tracing paper in their pocket! Tracing paper is actually a pretty good alternative for smoking papers, if you have the thin, high-quality stuff. Much better than a magazine or a receipt, anyway—but yeah, perhaps not the most common pocket item. On the other hand, if you’re just a regular, uncreative Joe with no tracing paper about your person (you poor peasant), you may still be in luck if you happen to have a few sticks of gum in your pocket. That silvery foil stuff that your sticks of gum come wrapped in? If you can rub the foil part off without damaging the paper underneath, that paper can act as a pretty reasonable substitute Rizla—and as a bonus, all the sugary-gummy residual goodness left on the paper should help stick it together, with a little help from your tongue. Although this technically counts as a replacement rolling paper, it’s so good it deserves a section of its own. The outer layers of an ear of sweetcorn can be dried and used as a natural rolling paper, and probably represents the least harmful option listed so far! The husk is naturally soft, flexible and fibrous, and retains these qualities even when dry. Many countries that produce both corn and cannabis use corn husks to roll joints as a traditional method of consumption. In Jamaica, an island that is globally known for its high-quality cannabis, sun-drying corn husks to later use as rolling papers is a widespread practice. Here they are typically soaked in water briefly prior to rolling, to ensure that their flexibility is maximised.

Mexico and the USA are other countries where cannabis users report use of this method—in the USA, pre-dried corn husks can be purchased in the Mexican section of many large supermarkets, particularly in the South. As well as corn, fibres from several other plants can substitute for rolling papers—and may even prove preferable in terms of flavour, as many report the ‘papery’ taste to be absent. The fibrous inner membrane of bamboo is one substitute, and the bark (or the layer beneath the bark) of several trees is light and flexible enough to be used.

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