cleaning bong with acetone

Schools usually cite disciplinary policies (sometimes called the student code of conduct) in student handbooks. The rules usually cover expectations, and consequences for not meeting the expectations, for things like student behavior, dress codes, use of electronic devices, and acceptable language. The policies may include details about attendance, vandalism, cheating, fighting, and weapons. Many schools also have specific policies about bullying.

It's helpful to know the school's definition of bullying, consequences for bullies, support for victims, and procedures for reporting bullying. Bullying via text or social media should be reported to the school too. It's important for your teen to know what's expected at school and that you'll support the school's consequences when expectations aren't met. It's easiest for students when school expectations match the ones at home, so they see both environments as safe and caring places that work together as a team. It's also important to note that educators may call law enforcement officials to the school for serious infractions, and consequences may differ based on students' ages. Volunteering at the high school is a great way to show you're interested in your teen's education. Keep in mind, though, that while some teens like to see their parents at school or school events, others may feel embarrassed by their parents' presence. Follow your teen's cues to determine how much interaction works for both of you, and whether your volunteering should stay behind the scenes.

Make it clear that you aren't there to spy — you're just trying to help out the school community. Parents and guardians can get involved by: serving as a grade-level chairperson organizing and/or working at fundraising activities and other special events, like bake sales, car washes, and book fairs, or working at a concession stand at athletic events chaperoning field trips, dances, and proms attending school board meetings joining the school's parent-teacher group working as a library assistant mentoring or tutoring students reading a story to the class giving a talk for career day attending school concerts, plays, and athletic events. Check the school or school district website to find volunteer opportunities that fit your schedule. Even giving a few hours during the school year can make an impression on your teen. Teens should take a sick day if they have a fever, are nauseated, vomiting, or have diarrhea. Otherwise, it's important that they arrive at school on time every day, because having to catch up with class work, projects, tests, and homework can be stressful and interfere with learning. Teens may have many reasons for not wanting to go to school — bullies, difficult assignments, low grades, social problems, or issues with classmates or teachers. Talk with your teen — and then perhaps with an administrator or school counselor — to find out more about what's causing any anxiety. Students also may be late to school due to sleep problems. Keeping your teen on a consistent daily sleep schedule can help avoid tiredness and tardiness. For teens who have a chronic health issue, educators will work with the families and may limit workloads or assignments so students can stay on track. A 504 plan can help teens with medical needs or health concerns be successful at school. Talk to school administrators if you are interested in developing a 504 plan for your child. Because many teens spend so much of the day outside the home — at school, extracurricular activities, jobs, or with peers — staying connected with them can be challenging for parents and guardians. While activities at school, new interests, and expanding social circles are central to the lives of high school students, parents and guardians are still their anchors for providing love, guidance, and support. Make efforts to talk with your teen every day, so he or she knows that what goes on at school is important to you. When teens know their parents are interested in their academic lives, they'll take school seriously as well. Because communication is a two-way street, the way you talk and listen to your teen can influence how well he or she listens and responds. It's important to listen carefully, make eye contact, and avoid multitasking while you chat. Remember to talk with your teen, not at him or her. Be sure to ask open-ended questions that go beyond "yes" or "no" answers. Besides during family meals, good times to talk include car trips (though eye contact isn't needed here, of course), walking the dog, preparing meals, or standing in line at a store. When teens know they can talk openly with their parents, the challenges of high school can be easier to face. This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. wikiHow's Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards.

There are 21 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. It may seem like a hassle to keep your bong clean, but it’s a super important part of having an enjoyable and safe smoke. Leftover water can cause mold to grow, and residual resin can impact the flavor of your next session.

Use simple ingredients you already have at home, like rubbing alcohol and salt or white vinegar and baking soda, to give your bong a thorough cleaning every couple of days. You can even use lemon juice to get rid of hard water stains. With time, cleaning your bong will become second nature!

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