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How to clean a grinder

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Contents

  1. What is a grinder?
  2. What you need to clean a grinder
  3. How to clean a grinder: Step-by-step process
  4. Bottom line

What is a grinder?

Grinding your weed before smoking is a crucial step in the consumption process. Using a grinder gives you an even and consistent burn when you’re smoking, maximizes efficiency, and lets you get the most smoke out of your bud. While you can always pick apart your weed with your fingers, using a specialized herb grinder is by far the best way to break your cannabis down into smaller, more smokable pieces.

Using a specialized herb grinder is by far the best way to break your cannabis down into smaller, more smokable pieces. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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There are a few different types of weed grinders. The first and simplest model is a single chamber with metal grinding teeth and a lid that either snaps or screws into place. The underside of the lid also has grinding teeth that work in tandem with the teeth inside the main chamber. To use this type of weed grinder, simply press a couple of nugs down into the grinding teeth, put the lid on, and twist. As you twist, the grinding teeth in the main chamber and on the lid chop the herb into small, uniform pieces.

In addition to this simple, single-chamber design, there are grinders that function in a similar fashion but that include multiple chambers stacked onto each other. The top chamber contains the grinding teeth where you place your nugs before twisting the lid back and forth to break up the herb. There are a series of holes in the bottom of this top grinding chamber, through which the herb falls into a catch located directly beneath the grinding teeth. To access the ground-up herb, unscrew the catch chamber from the grinding chamber and pinch or dump out the herb you’re going to use.

There are grinders that include multiple chambers stacked onto each other. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Multi-chambered grinders typically have a mesh screen across the bottom of the catching. The screen filters out the chunks of plant matter from the much finer, powdery kief, which falls through the screen and into a kief catcher. Some grinders have multiple screens to separate out the super fine grains of kief from the larger grains of kief. Either way, these multi-chambered grinders allow you to isolate and keep the cannabinoid-rich kief for future use.

Finally, some weed grinders use rotating blades rather than grinding teeth. These grinders can produce a more uniform final product, as the blades cleanly slice the herb rather than forcefully grinding it apart into small chunks.

What you need to clean a grinder

The problem with grinders is that they eventually get gunked up with small pieces of plant matter, powdery kief, and sticky resin. When this happens, the lid can get stuck and difficult to work with, and it can be a challenge to rotate the grinding teeth or cutting blades back and forth. When this happens, it’s time to clean your grinder. Here’s everything you’ll need to get your grinder into like-new condition:

Assemble what you need to clean your grinder. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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  • Your dirty grinder
  • A toothpick
  • A small, soft-bristled brush
  • A freezer
  • A plate or bowl
  • Isopropyl alcohol
  • A toothbrush or some other type of stiff brush
  • A Ziploc bag or glass jar
  • Clean water
  • A towel

How to clean a grinder: Step-by-step process

There are two main ways to clean a grinder. The first way is faster and simpler but won’t allow you to save the plant material leftover in the grinder. The second way takes a bit longer and requires some extra steps but will let you harvest some potentially potent residue for future use.

Method 1: Quick clean your grinder

Step 1: Disassemble the dirty grinder

Begin by taking apart and separating each chamber of your grinder. At this point, you can quickly harvest a little bit of leftover plant material by dumping out and saving as much of the loose leftovers as you can.

Begin by taking apart and separating each chamber of your grinder. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Step 2: Soak the grinder in alcohol

Place the grinder into a container of some sort—a Ziploc bag or large glass jar work best. Fill the container with enough isopropyl alcohol to fully submerge all parts of the grinder. Let the grinder soak for 20-30 minutes and agitate the container every once in awhile to help break apart plant residue.

Fill the container with enough isopropyl alcohol to fully submerge all parts of the grinder. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Step 3: Scrub the grinder

Pour out the alcohol and use a stiff-bristled brush to scrub your grinder. Don’t forget to wash each chamber, scrape along the grinding teeth, and scour the lids.

Pour out the alcohol and use a stiff-bristled brush to scrub your grinder. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Step 4: Rinse and dry the grinder

Use clean warm water to rinse your grinder thoroughly. Be sure to wash away all alcohol and any remaining plant material. Dry off your grinder with a clean towel. Once the grinder is completely dry, you’re ready to start grinding again.

Use clean warm water to rinse your grinder thoroughly. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Method 2: Deep Clean Your Grinder

Step 1: Disassemble the dirty grinder

If your grinder is so clogged up with plant residue that it’s hard to get a smooth back-and-forth grinding or slicing motion, it’s time to deep clean it. Start by disassembling the grinder and removing each chamber from the others. As you do this, be careful that you don’t spill any of the plant matter that’s left over inside the chambers.

Step 2: Dump out residue

Dump out leftover plant matter onto a plate or into a bowl. You’ll save this material for later use. At this point, you’re simply trying to harvest the stuff that’s only loosely caked into the grinder; don’t worry about the material still clinging to the chambers of your grinder. You’ll take care of that in the next step.

Dump out leftover plant matter onto a plate or into a bowl. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Step 2: Freeze the grinder

Arrange each piece of the grinder to sit upright inside the freezer. Leave the grinder in the freezer for at least 30 minutes. Freezing the plant residue this way makes it stiffer and, as it freezes, it will start forming into small clumps rather than clinging tightly to the grinder, all of which simplifies the scraping of the residue out of the grinder.

Freezing the grinder makes the plant residue stiffer and it will start forming into small clumps rather than clinging tightly to the grinder. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Step 3: Harvest plant residue

Remove the grinder from the freezer. Use a toothpick and small soft-bristled brush to gently scrape away as much of the plant material as you can. As before, use your plate or bowl to collect everything. Remember to scrape around the edges of all the chambers, along the sides of the grinding teeth, and around the circumference of each chamber’s lid. Most of this plant residue—especially the powdery kief—is incredibly rich in cannabinoids and very potent, so be sure you keep everything you harvest for future use.

Use a toothpick and small soft-bristled brush to gently scrape away as much of the plant material as you can. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Step 4: Soak in alcohol

When you’re satisfied that you’ve harvested as much of the leftover plant material as you possibly can, it’s time to make your grinder spotless. Place each chamber inside a large Ziploc bag or a glass jar. Fill the container with enough isopropyl alcohol to fully submerge the grinder. Let everything soak for at least 20 minutes. Every once in a while, give the container a gentle swirl to help break apart any plant matter stuck to the grinder.

Step 5: Clean off remaining residue

Pour out the alcohol and remove the grinder from the container. Use a toothbrush or another stiff brush to scrub your grinder clean. In this step, you’ll get rid of the most tenacious residue—the stuff that’s really gunking up your grinder and making it hard to use.

Step 6: Rinse and dry

Finally, give the grinder a good rinse in clean hot water, making sure that all the alcohol and plant residue are gone. Use a clean towel to dry off the grinder, including inside the chambers and around the grinding teeth.

Use a clean towel to dry off the grinder, including inside the chambers and around the grinding teeth. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Step 7: Start grinding again

At this point, your grinder should be pretty much spotless—almost as clean as the day you first got it. You will immediately notice how smoothly the device rotates and grinds, and how much neater and more uniform your small chunks of herb will become. When your grinder is completely dry and in like-new condition, go ahead and load up a few nugs, grind them down, and enjoy your smoke.

At this point, your grinder should be pretty much spotless—almost as clean as the day you first got it. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Bottom line

A clean grinder is essential to getting the most out of your cannabis experience, and you can keep your device in top condition with a few household supplies along with a little elbow grease.

How to clean a grinder Copy article link to clipboard. Link copied to clipboard. Contents What is a grinder? What you need to clean a grinder How to clean a grinder:

How To Clean A Grinder In 5 Easy Steps | Honest Marijuana

Don’t let your lack of knowledge about how to clean a grinder be a deterrent to maintaining your cannabis equipment. There are plenty of good reasons to keep your grinder clean, and it’s really not that difficult when you get the hang of it.

In this article, the experts at Honest Marijuana will show you how to clean a grinder in five easy steps — with no muss and no fuss.

And if a clean tool isn’t motivation enough for you, we’ll show you how to use the leftover plant matter to take your smoke sesh to the next level.

First, though, let’s talk about what a grinder is so you’re not trying to clean the wrong thing (how high are you?!).

A Grinder By Any Other Name…Would Still Be A Grinder

We love ganja slang as much as the next person, but we do have to admit that, at times, it’s not the most descriptive lexicon.

Take “sploof,” for example. It sounds like a soggy shirt dropped onto a tile floor. It certainly doesn’t bring to mind a cardboard tube packed with dryer sheets or activated charcoal.

And what about “chronic?” If you didn’t already know the history behind this word, you’d have no idea what it means.

Thankfully, a grinder is just a grinder. No research required. At the most general level, a grinder is a machine used to — wait for it — grind something!

It’s not a huge leap, then, to figure out what a marijuana grinder is: a small container with “teeth” used to grind cannabis flowers into smaller pieces.

“But,” you might say, “do I really need a grinder to enjoy my weed?”

Honestly? No, you don’t need a grinder to enjoy your weed. You can just shred it with your fingers. And, really, that’s how we’ll all do it anyway when the world goes to hell in a handbasket next Wednesday.

But until then, it’s better to use the tools at hand rather than your hands as tools. Here’s why.

The Daily Grind Isn’t A Bad Thing

Grinders Improve Your Weed

Didn’t think there was any way to make weed better than it already is, did you? Well guess again.

Grinding your pot before puffing improves potency, taste, and smell.

Taste has a significant effect on anything you put in your mouth. And smell is a big part of that experience.

Ever plugged your nose in order to choke down those last few pieces of cooked broccoli on your plate? Of course. We all have.

Why did you plug your nose? So you wouldn’t have to taste the vile flavor of said cruciferous vegetable. That’s how much smell affects flavor.

Grinding your herb unlocks the fruity, chocolaty, skunky flavors that make the Mary Jane experience more than just inhaling psychedelic smoke.

Grinding your cannabis before rolling a joint or packing a bowl also improves potency. Smaller-sized pieces are easier to burn and will burn more evenly when compared to larger chunks.

And if you’ve ever handled raw marijuana buds, you know just how sticky they can be. The more you touch them, the more trichomes (the stuff that gets you high or makes you feel better) adhere to your fingers.

Trichomes on your fingers do absolutely no good for anyone.

Grinding limits the contact your grubby little fingers have with the trichomes and preserves the potency of the pot for a better overall experience.

Grinders Produce Kief

One of the very best things about grinders is that they produce kief. Kief is the terpenes and cannabinoids that separate from the trichomes during the grinding process.

What makes kief so great? It’s an extremely pure and potent part of the pot plant.

Once collected, you can sprinkle it hither and yon to add an extra kick to all your marijuana activities.

We’ll talk more about this powdered perfection later on in the how-to section of this article.

Grinders Save You Time

Grinders shred your bud in half the time it would take for you to do it by hand.

They also keep the sticky mess contained in a smaller space so you don’t spread trichomes to every surface in your house. As marvelous as that may sound, trust us, it’s not. Sticky is very seldom a pleasant experience.

Grinders Make Your Hash Less Harsh

As we mentioned earlier, small, ground pieces of cannabis burn more evenly and completely than larger chunks. When all of the plant matter goes up in smoke, it makes the whole experience less harsh.

There will be less coughing and less burning, and you’ll enjoy every hit.

Grinders Save You Money

Yes, you’ll have to shell out some dough to buy the grinder. After that, though, your new tool will actually save you money in the long run.

Ground marijuana is more potent than whole bud, so you’ll use less of the ground stuff to get the same high. That means you can stretch the ounce of Cherry OG farther than you ever have before. Woo hoo!

Why You Should Clean Your Grinder

1) Keeps You From Getting Sick

Those nugs of bud we all love were once live plant matter. And even though they’ve been dried and cured, they will eventually start to decompose.

That means bacteria will start to grow on any leftover kief in your grinder. And in case you were absent that day in middle school, bacteria can make you sick. Clean your grinder and stay healthy longer.

2) Ensures The Smooth Operation Of Your Grinder

Periodic cleaning ensures that your grinder will work smoothly when you need it most.

Grinding cannabis is a sticky job, and some of that sticky icky will get stuck in your grinder. That can gum up the works and make your grinder not only harder to turn but less efficient to boot.

More effort and less finely-ground grass? No thanks. We’ll clean our grinder, thank you.

3) Helps Extend The Life Of Your Grinder

Entropy is a harsh mistress, that’s for sure. Systems break down. Objects degrade. And the teeth on your grinder get dull. Damn you, entropy!

But you can defy decay by cleaning your grinder regularly. This keeps the teeth sharp and the “turny mechanism” smooth and easy-to-use.

And it really is worth the effort to give the finger to a property of thermodynamics (think about this when you’re high and you’ll understand).

When You Should Clean Your Grinder

Along with how to clean a grinder, many people wonder when to clean a grinder. The answer is every 30 to 60 days.

That, of course, depends on how often you’re grinding. If you pulverize pot every day, the cannabinoids and terpenes (a.k.a. trichomes) will build up faster on the surface of your grinder and necessitate more frequent cleanings

If you only grind your ganja once or twice a month, you can probably get away with cleaning it every 60 days.

The Parts Of The Grinder You’ll Need To Clean

The title of this section is a little misleading. You’ll need to clean ALL the parts of your grinder. The reason we bring it up, though, is because some grinders have more pieces than others.

The most basic grinder is composed of two pieces: a grinding bowl and a lid (a.k.a. a two-piece/single-chamber grinder). Within the chamber, and often on the lid as well, are “teeth” (sometimes called pegs) that do the actual grinding.

Place your weed in the bowl, screw on the lid, and you’re ready to go. Actually, that’s how all grinders work, but the other types are a bit more complicated.

Next on the grinder complexity scale (or GCS for short) is the three-piece/two-chamber variety.

A three-piece/two-chamber grinder is identical to the single-chamber grinder but has a collection bowl underneath. So instead of two pieces to clean, you now have three (lid, grinding bowl, collection chamber).

In some models, you might also find a removable screen between grinding and collection areas. That would give you a fourth piece to keep clean (lid, grinding bowl, removable screen, collection chamber).

The final entry on the GCS is the four-piece/three-chamber grinder. Instead of a solid bottom, the collection chamber has a smaller (sometimes removable) screen and another container underneath.

During the grinding process, larger pieces of cannabis collect on top of this screen, but the pollen-like kief falls through to the bottom chamber.

So with a four-piece/three-chamber grinder, you could have upwards of six different pieces to clean on a regular basis (lid, grinding bowl, first removable screen, collection chamber, second removable screen, kief chamber).

Now that you understand what a grinder is and how they’re put together, let’s turn our attention to cleaning them.

How To Clean A Grinder

Grinders come in many different shapes, sizes, and materials. The first two variables aren’t really a concern when considering how to clean a grinder…unless it’s so big or so wonkily-shaped that it won’t fit in your freezer.

If you find yourself in this situation, all we can say is, “Damn, son, send us a picture of that monster grinder!”

The third variable — grinder material — is extremely important when trying to decide how to clean a grinder.

Metals will rust when exposed to water. Acrylics and other plastics will dissolve, warp, and generally degrade when exposed to isopropyl alcohol.

That’s why it’s imperative to figure out what your grinder is made of before you clean it. If you somehow managed to purchase a grinder with both plastic and metal parts, you’re basically screwed.

No, not really. You just have to be extra careful and break the cleaning process down into more steps.

We’ll explain how to clean a grinder made of metal and how to clean a grinder made of plastic in the step-by-step guide below. But first, let’s assemble our tools.

Tools To Make The Job Easier

  • Isopropyl alcohol (for metal grinders)
  • Dish soap (for acrylic and plastic grinders)
  • Hot water
  • Freezer (optional but highly recommended)
  • Large plate or plastic cutting board
  • Container to hold the kief
  • Toothbrush or soft paintbrush
  • Toothpick, metal pick, or dab tool

5 Easy Steps To Clean A Grinder

1) Disassemble Your Grinder

Disassemble your grinder into as many small pieces as possible (without breaking it, of course).

If you use a four-piece, three-chamber grinder, you’ll probably have a lid, the grinding chamber, the collection chamber, and the kief chamber. Two- and three-piece grinders will have fewer pieces (Duh!).

Some grinders will have a removable screen between the collection chamber and the kief chamber. Be careful when you remove this screen. It’s fragile.

Too much force or a sharp nail can break a hole in the screen that will render it about as useful as an ashtray on a motorcycle or a screen door on a battleship.

2) To The Freezer!

This step is optional, but it does make the next few steps so much easier.

Place all the pieces of your grinder in the freezer for 30 minutes. This will harden all the sticky plant matter that’s clinging to the surface of your grinder.

This is especially useful for dislodging every last bit of canna-goodness from the screen between your collection chamber and kief chamber.

Handle your plastic grinder with care after you remove it from the freezer. Plastic becomes brittle at low temperatures.

3) Tap, Brush, Scrape

After removing the grinder parts from the freezer, hold them over a plastic cutting board and tap them gently against your hand or the surface of the cutting board.

If you don’t have a plastic cutting board, a plate works just as well. Honestly, you just need a surface where you can collect the leftover plant matter. A cereal bowl or your partner’s belly works just as well.

Next, brush all the surfaces of the grinder with a toothbrush or soft paintbrush. And just so you’re clear, we’re not talking a wall paintbrush. You’ll find it much easier if you use a watercolor paintbrush or something of similar size.

If some stubborn gunk refuses to come off, scrape the area with a toothpick or dab tool.

DO NOT DISCARD THIS STUFF!

Just because it’s been living in your grinder for the past month, doesn’t mean it’s not still some good #&@$.

This is the most labor-intensive part of the whole process, but the freezing makes it so much easier. You can skip the 30-minutes of freezer time if you want, but you’ll probably spend two, three, or four times as long trying to pick all the waxy stuff off your grinder.

4) Bring On The Alcohol Or Water

It’s at this point that how you clean a grinder will diverge into two different paths depending on whether you have a metal grinder or a plastic grinder.

For metal grinders, submerge the pieces in a bowl or plastic baggie of isopropyl alcohol. This will kill any bacteria that might be hiding in the nooks and crannies.

Feel free to agitate the bowl or baggie a bit to loosen up any stubborn plant matter. Then let everything soak until the liquid turns a light brown color or until a visual inspection shows that all the last particles have come loose.

For plastic grinders, boil some water on the stove and then drop your grinder pieces into the pot. Reduce the heat to a gentle boil (so you don’t melt the freakin’ grinder, you pyro) and then leave the grinder in the hot water for one minute.

Remove the grinder pieces from the liquid hot magma (a la Dr. Evil) with cooking tongs, and then set them on a towel to cool. Be sure to wait 10 minutes to give the pieces plenty of time to reach room temperature.

5) Reassemble And Enjoy

After the pieces of your grinder are cool, it’s time to reassemble and enjoy the fruits of your labor. Oooh! Feel how easy it turns? Isn’t that worth all the back-breaking work?

The answer is yes.

How To Use The Goo From Your Grinder

Remember how we told you not to discard anything you remove from your grinder (DON’T DO IT!)? Here’s why.

That stuff is pure, unadulterated kief. And it’s often of higher quality than the stuff you pull out on a regular basis because it was “fresher” when you ground your cannabis.

So unless you’re grinding cheese or nuts between bouts of cannabis (in which case, eeew), don’t let this ganja gold go to waste.

Not sure how to use the kief you get after cleaning your grinder? Here are a few suggestions:

  • Decarboxylate it and mix it into your favorite edible
  • Sprinkle a bit on your joint before you close
  • Add a smidge to the bowl of your bong
  • Roll your blunt in this fairy dust
  • Use it to make weed tea

The sky’s the limit on how you can use the kief you get after cleaning your grinder. Exercise your imagination and have fun. That’s what cannabis is all about.

Many people debate about how to clean a grinder. In this article, the experts at Honest Marijuana give you the definitive answer in five easy steps. ]]>