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The high-capacity Firefly 2+ quickly produces more intense, tasty vapor than competitors, and it’s attractive and easy to clean—but it’s expensive, and it buries critical info in an app. If you’re looking for top-notch vapor or want something that’s easy to pass to friends, we recommend the Firefly 2+. It has an attractive design, the quickest heat time of any model we tested, and an easy-to-clean chamber.

Its size makes it less pocketable than our other picks, but it’s still small enough for solo sessions at home and group settings. The Firefly’s design makes it easy to load—all you do is pop off the magnetic lid and load a generous amount of ground flower into the chamber. Tap its capacitive buttons, and the device heats in about three seconds. Its design is unique in that the airway is really the entire underside of the lid, forming a wide channel that keeps the mouthpiece cooler than those of most other vaporizers. The Firefly lacks an on-device display, and the product originally relied on an app that, as of November 15, 2019, has been removed from the App Store; it remains available on Google Play for Android devices. The app, which continues to function if you already had it downloaded, is not necessary for regular use. But it is the easiest way to set precise temperatures or check the battery life. After the Apple news, Firefly sent an update, which included a link to a video showing how to set the temperature of the Firefly 2+ without using the app. It is a ridiculously complex procedure, requiring you to press hold the righthand button while tapping the lefthand button ad infinitum , all to achieve “highest” and “lowest” temperatures—the actual number only appears in the app. To add context, though: Once you have it set to a temperature you like, you probably wouldn’t mess with it regularly even if it were easier.

The charging dock, which is bulkier than the Grasshopper’s proprietary cord, is another inconvenience, and you need to carry it with you if you plan on charging the Firefly away from home. You can get to a full charge in just over an hour, about the same as with the AirVape. A plus: The Firefly has a replaceable battery, so you can swap on the go if you don’t bring the charger. In tests, we got in the habit of just leaving it on the charging dock and topping off battery life betweeen uses—a method that reduces frustration whether you frequently check the battery life on the app, or if you’re stuck without an app at all. The Firefly’s convection oven sits at the opposite end of the mouthpiece, and the concave lid shape lets air travel down the entire body of the device—it’s very easy to wipe clean. But the thing that makes these compromises worth tolerating is the vapor quality, which was the best of all the vaporizers we tested: easy to draw, smooth, and remarkably cool, with a delightful hint of citrus. It’s also surprisingly potent—the Firefly uses convection heating, like the Grasshopper, which tends to produce more intense effects per puff than conduction vaporizers like the AirVape. The large oven heats up only when you’re pressing the buttons, which prevents the flower from continuing to burn between puffs. This combination of potency, efficiency, and the high capacity of its bowl makes it perfect for puffing and passing the device in a group of more than two people. A full battery lasted through about two bowls, each of which would have been enough for two to four people to share. Given the Firefly’s efficiency at burning material, we didn’t need to inhale as much as with other vaporizers we tested. We found that after we stopped getting vapor, mixing the flower around in the chamber gave us a few extra puffs before we needed to refill. The Firefly is easy to wipe free of residue with an alcohol wipe once you’re done and you’ve emptied the chamber. The Firefly’s charging dock is bulky and inconvenient, but you can swap in a charged second battery for use on the go. The Firefly has a greater learning curve compared with the other vaporizers we tested, because it doesn’t have an on-device display or any clear indicators. If you want to change what the Firefly’s two buttons do, you can do so within the app, but we found that the capacitive nature of the buttons made any configuration tricky to get the hang of. The Grenco Science G Pen Elite is a little cheaper and a little worse than the AirVape. It’s a nice vaporizer overall, with simple controls, vapor that our testers enjoyed, convenient charging, decent battery life, and a sleek design that’s portable and functional. The lower price is appropriate, as the Elite is a touch below the AirVape in several ways, including vapor quality, ease of cleaning, and other design details. This was formerly a budget pick in this guide, but in long term tests, we found we consistently preferred our other picks over it. In a battle for great vapor flavor, the Storz & Bickel Crafty, Arizer ArGo, and DaVinci IQ would all rank very close to one another. All three had rich flavor that made our taste buds sing. The ArGo also had particularly smooth vapor, though the IQ and Crafty weren’t far behind. But all three devices are expensive, and the flavor is the only real advantage. Each one had other disadvantages too—cleaning problems with the Crafty, durability concerns when traveling with the ArGo, and a combination of cleaning and interface flaws with the IQ.

We liked it for its digital temperature controls, easy-to-load chamber, and accessible price. But the G Pen Elite often hovers around the same price and offers higher quality vapor, a better display, and an overall better experience. The DaVinci Miqro has a pleasant aesthetic and it’s compact enough to take on the go, but its preset temperatures make it a more limited choice than our picks. Its deep chamber also makes the DaVinci tougher to load than our picks, and its mouthpiece gets hot quickly. The Linx Gaia requires a cap to protect its glass stem and the vapor quality is just so-so. If you’re looking solely for vapor quality on a budget, the Arizer Air does a better job than any other but that’s its only bright point.

We disliked the color-coded LED control scheme, and the DC-input charger means you’d need to carry a special charger instead of a convenient Micro-USB cable. Plus, the polarizing design, with its conspicuous glass stem, isn’t something most people will want to tote around. The Pax 3 corrects most of the problems of its predecessor, the Pax 2, with a cooler mouthpiece, better vapor production, and the ability to vaporize dry herbs or concentrates. But even the improved Pax 3 doesn’t strike us as worth the price with so many great picks available for less.

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